Block-based programming environments are a popular way to introduce programming as they provide helpful visual cues and remove the complexities of syntax, allowing learners to focus on being creative. However, input to programs in block-based environments is often limited to the keyboard and mouse, meaning programs respond only to the direct actions of the user. Allowing programs to respond to changes in the physical environment may influence the types of programs students create and their motivation and interest towards learning programming. We explore this idea by integrating real-time sensor data into Scratch. With our platform, students simply connect a sensor to their computer via USB and use custom blocks, alongside conventional Scratch code, to read and react to the sensor data in real-time.

Scratch and Sense

Block-based programming environments are a popular way to introduce programming as they provide helpful visual cues and remove the complexities of syntax, allowing learners to focus on being creative. However, input to programs in block-based environments is often limited to the keyboard and mouse, meaning programs respond only to the direct actions of the user. Allowing programs to respond to changes in the physical environment may influence the types of programs students create and their motivation and interest towards learning programming. We explore this idea by integrating real-time sensor data into Scratch. With our platform, students simply connect a sensor to their computer via USB and use custom blocks, alongside conventional Scratch code, to read and react to the sensor data in real-time.

Block-based programming environments are a popular way to introduce programming as they provide helpful visual cues and remove the complexities of syntax, allowing learners to focus on being creative. However, input to programs in block-based environments is often limited to the keyboard and mouse, meaning programs respond only to the direct actions of the user. Allowing programs to respond to changes in the physical environment may influence the types of programs students create and their motivation and interest towards learning programming. We explore this idea by integrating real-time sensor data into Scratch. With our platform, students simply connect a sensor to their computer via USB and use custom blocks, alongside conventional Scratch code, to read and react to the sensor data in real-time.

Scratch and Sense

Block-based programming environments are a popular way to introduce programming as they provide helpful visual cues and remove the complexities of syntax, allowing learners to focus on being creative. However, input to programs in block-based environments is often limited to the keyboard and mouse, meaning programs respond only to the direct actions of the user. Allowing programs to respond to changes in the physical environment may influence the types of programs students create and their motivation and interest towards learning programming. We explore this idea by integrating real-time sensor data into Scratch. With our platform, students simply connect a sensor to their computer via USB and use custom blocks, alongside conventional Scratch code, to read and react to the sensor data in real-time.